A Five Guns Pre-release preview. Available September 2015.

Meet Sarah. Age Unknown. The children of he Lynch Plantation has been her life. They respect her. She has those she personally watches over, nearly all of them. Runs the cook house. Tells them stories and even mends their clothing. And even with the burden of the children in the bungalows, Adam, her son, is never far from her sights, even as he works the fields in the scorching sunlight.

Sarah is one of the first adults, Nathaniel aka, Laetitia interacts with on the Island of Barbados, as she arrives, with her mother, into service. She proves to be more than just the kitchen maid or a slave quickly. Arguing to set straight, Nathan’s sleeping and care arrangements with one of the older girls in the bungalow, Nathaniel sleeps.

From a distance her advice and words help Laetitia, dressed a Nathaniel spring into early adulthood and navigate the trenches of forced service. Sarah does not shy away because Nathaniel is white, she instead guides the child every chance she gets. Though Nathaniel is white, she treats him like any other child within her keep, advising and even scolding. Protecting like a lioness where necessary.

She is an integral piece to the plantation’s natural flow. Helping to make critical decisions for the folk who work out in the fields, particularly the children. Not only providing meals for the children and adult slaves, but for the whole plantation, including the Lynch household. She takes the job only like a mother should. With care. Patience. And a guardian’s eye. She holds no quarter when she needs to get involved in any other portion of life there.

Sarah’s strict advice is unmistakable. Her life, means nothing if her own child, Adam is not safe. When Adam faces the redemptioner’s whip for defending himself against an accusation, she not only begs for her son, but also makes a revelation that could put her in his place or get her killed. In turn, she takes a part of his punishment in front of everyone on the Lynch plantation.

These actions galvanize her as a mother. Not only as an important part of life in service. But, as an unknown variable in Laetitia’s life beyond the plantation, beyond the life of a little girl, once dressed as a boy.

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Dr Walton


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